Every now and then, we need a little something more than words on a page to get inspired. Hearing someone talk to us--or even just hearing someone's voice--is really all that's necessary to get our gears turning and make us more motivated to change. Here are five TED Talks that'll inspire you to get the train moving.

1. Malcolm Gladwell: Choice, Happiness and Spaghetti Sauce

In this talk, Tipping Point author Malcolm Gladwell ties the food industry's pursuit of the perfect spaghetti sauce to the way we find happiness in everyday life. Embracing a larger subset in people, as well as in food, will open up the doors to happiness we couldn't have previously imagined.

2. Cameron Russell: Looks Aren't everything. Believe Me, I'm a Model

Cameron Russell, who has walked runways for names like Victoria's Secret and Chanel, is no stranger to the pressure of looking good. In her talk, Russell poignantly encourages people to remember that our perceived appearances and failures are not everything, and we can live a much fuller life with that knowledge under our belt.

3. Dan Gilbert: Why We Make Bad Decisions

Harvard psychologist Dan Gilbert shares the results of research and experiments he has conducted himself in a Q&A with the audience. Gilbert addresses things that lead to people's unhappiness we don't often think about, such as the effect of expectations, temporary satisfaction, and the impact of the future.

4. Daniel Kahneman: The Riddle of Experience vs. Memory

Daniel Kahneman, Nobel laureate and founder of behavioral economics, explains the much-discussed topic of perception in past memory and current experience. Through his startling insights, we understand the implications of his talk on our own self-awareness--and how to broaden it--every day.

5. Rachel Botsman: The Case for Collaborative Consumption

With the advent of a new technological space, many industries are moving toward a new model of work. Sharing, once a novelty, is now a crucial aspect of many contemporary companies. Applying the importance of a collaborative space in work to our everyday lives will undoubtedly change the way we interact with others for the better.

Published on: Nov 5, 2015
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