No matter what we're doing, getting organized is always one thing we never seem to completely achieve, and it's something most all of us could use a little more of. But getting organized doesn't just happen all by itself--it takes a concerted effort over a period of time to make happen.

1. Make a calendar, and stick to it

Regardless of whether you use a physical planner or an online system, keeping a calendar to bookmark the things you have to do--every single day--is an easy, concrete way to make sure you get things done and compartmentalize your tasks.

2. Determine realistic goals

When you set realistic and achievable goals, it's much easier to finish what you plan to do on a consistent basis. Determine what goals make the most sense for you, and set up a detailed game plan on how to achieve them one at a time. Lots of small goals are better than one, humongous goal.

3. Name your priorities at the beginning of each day

Set aside at least 15 minutes for yourself at the start of the day to do all the things you need to do to get organized. Refrain from sending emails, filling out your calendar, or returning missed calls and texts. Instead, take time to sit with yourself and name what you want to accomplish that day. It'll be worth the meditative spirit.

4. Prioritize your priorities

Make it a point to do the most important things first--not just the easiest ones. If you question the tactic, just think about how many things you've put off in your life by claiming that you'll "do it later."

5. Do a large cleanup

At the end of the day, take 15 minutes to organize things you might have left undone. Now is when you should respond to missed emails, unseen messages, or move things around on your calendar. Throw away everything you don't need, and remember to look over what you've got going on tomorrow.

6. Declutter your space

When your workspace is messy, so is your brain. Throw away any trash, and put things in place for a second. It'll make the whole place feel new again.

Published on: Jun 29, 2017
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