Do you love being praised as the office workaholic? Are you finding yourself running your life from your inbox? 

Although it's important to be proud of your work ethic and your ability to stay on top of things, you may want to prioritize taking a breather, too.

As more workers find themselves near their breaking points, burnout is becoming more common in the workplace. In fact, job stress has hit younger generations too, with burnout among under-30 women reaching higher levels than ever before.

When exhaustion results in job performance decline and a marked lack of interest in previously enjoyable activities, you may be experiencing burnout, according to the American Psychological Association. 

But some major business and tech figures are doing what it takes to end this burnout epidemic.

Arianna Huffington, co-founder of the Huffington Post, is working to revolutionize the way we work and live with the creation of Thrive Global, a "behavior change media and technology company offering science-based solutions to lower stress, and enhance well-being and performance."

New York-based Thrive will be coordinating with major companies, like JP Morgan and Uber, on improving work culture through workshops, courses, and other resources focused on wellness and work-life balance.   

Huffington's work with Thrive is also set to illuminate how technology is instigating unhealthy behavior as well: "We are at an inflection point in history where technology has granted us powers that accelerate the speed of life beyond our capacity to cope," she states. Having just raised $30 million in Series B funding, Thrive is set to release an app with Samsung that will help us become less obsessed with checking our smartphones. 

As Huffington notes, well-being and productivity are completely aligned. "When we are exhausted and running on empty," she says, "we are actually undermining our productivity and costing businesses and individuals a lot, financially and in every other way."

Published on: Dec 19, 2017
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