The first day at a new job. The first week. The first month.

Starting a new job is a time of excitement--and perhaps no small amount of anxiety and trepidation. Will I like my boss and coworkers? Will I like the work I do? Will I be good at the work I do?

We all have these questions and more as we get settled into a new job.

But for women it's even worse. Women are twice as likely than men to feel nervous until they've been in their new job a few months--and are more concerned than men about being liked in their new job.

And if you're a boss, know that your people have these questions and concerns, and that you are in the perfect position to help them get past their nervousness and become engaged and fully contributing members of the team.

According to job and career networking site LinkedIn, there's actually good reason for the anxiety we feel as new employees. People make plenty of mistakes in their first 90 days at a new job. Based on a survey of working professionals who manage others, the biggest mistakes people make in their first 90 days at a new job include:

1. Acting like a know-it-all (33 percent)

2. Failing to ask questions and clarify expectations (21 percent)

3. Trying to impose their ideas before they even learn the job (17 percent)

4. Taking on too much work, too soon (7 percent)

5. Ignoring corporate culture (6 percent)

So, aside from avoiding making these mistakes in the first 90 days on the job, what else can you do to make good impression on your boss and coworkers? LinkedIn suggests doing these specific things:

  • Be open to feedback
  • Be positive
  • Be proactive about learning new skills
  • Listen and ask thoughtful questions
  • Try to learn as much as possible about your new job, company and/or industry

According to LinkedIn, you've got two weeks to nail the first impression. Fully 63 percent of working professionals formulate an opinion of a new hire within their first two weeks, with 15 percent doing so immediately.

Make sure the first impression you make is a good one. 

Published on: Jan 15, 2020
The opinions expressed here by Inc.com columnists are their own, not those of Inc.com.