Curious to know how you may be communicating without any words at all? You might want to check your body language to find out.

There are a bunch of things we can say to people through movement alone--sometimes even without realizing it. Millennials, with their built-in technology skills, may be the biggest culprits for sending off signals they don't mean to when interacting with someone face-to-face.

Here are 3 body language habits that make millennials seem unprofessional, and what can be done to prevent them.

1. Getting distracted

When people lose interest in a topic, it's usually pretty clear right away. They'll start taking part in another equally engaging activity, like texting or scrolling social media, or have their eyes glazed over with boredom. In fact, your body might even involuntarily start responding to the boredom with random foot kicking or shrugging. If your body is sending off signals that you're not at all interested, you'll appear very unprofessional--especially during a meeting or professional conversation.

2. Slouching

In contemporary millennial workforces, maintaining a rigorously stern attitude isn't really necessary. There are, however, certain limits to the relaxed vibe of the workplace, such as the behavior we exhibit at our desks when we think nobody else is watching. Studies have shown that, when people feel an emotion, it immediately reveals itself in our bodies. So, the minute you feel disinterested, discouraged, or tired, slouching is the natural response. Combat this with increased attention to how you sit, or the position you take as you finish up your work.

3. Lack of eye contact

Eye contact has always been seen as a direct way of connecting to the person you're talking to. Without it, people can feel a real disconnect between the conversation and themselves. Distracted millennials might not be aware of the fact that looking around or, worse yet, at their phones may come across as unprofessional. Without even noticing it, they may not be able to truly build relationships with the people they work with.

Published on: May 11, 2017
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