Even when we're not speaking, our bodies always say more than we think they do. Despite being known for their gift of gab, millennials also sometimes have a hard time saying exactly what they want to--with their words as well as their bodies.

Check out these 5 body language mistakes that can paint you as unprofessional, and make sure you're not accidentally doing some of the same yourself.

1. Avoiding eye contact

Whether we're looking at our phones, at a screen, or simply at anything else in the near vicinity, it's important to note that those who do not look directly at others come across as disinterested in what the other person is saying. Millennials in particular, with their short attention span and penchant for hyper-connectivity, are perpetrators of looking away.

2. Speaking too fast

Slow down your words--when people talk slower, they appear less frenetic by nature and are able to reflect on their thoughts before ever choosing to share them with others. Often pegged for talking too much, millennials can benefit from slowing down their speech to appear more thoughtful.

3. Leaning away from your company

Slightly leaning away from the person you're with indicates that you have active repulsion towards their physical presence, or that you are considering how to best flee the conversation. Active signs of flight are definitely unprofessional and should be avoided whenever possible.

4. Being unanimated

The liveliness of the rising generation usually comes through the passion of their words--but it also needs to come from the gestures of their hands. It's important that millennials remain aware of how hand gestures typically help, not hurt, in improving the credibility the speaker possesses on the listener.

5. A weak handshake

The most classic mistake of them all is one that's definitely timeless across many, many generations. Millennials are also often already thought to be a bit awkward with traditional customs of the past--so show your workforce you know how to be strong, confident, and the most sociable of them all.

Published on: Mar 24, 2017
The opinions expressed here by Inc.com columnists are their own, not those of Inc.com.