Even though the idea of living forever is definitely not one that appeals to everyone, living a long life that is happy and fulfilling is a goal most of us possess. While the obvious steps to living longer are clear--such as maintaining good health, exercising, and eating well--the other, smaller things we can do might not be as clear. Lucky for us, however, we can follow in the footsteps of those who have figured it all out before us and take some notes from the best.

Jacques Clemens is, at 107 years old, the oldest living priest in the world. The secret for Clemens to living to his ripe age? A strict routine.

The Belgian, who recently celebrated his 80th anniversary as a Catholic priest, claims that the way he's maintained such a long life is his unwavering daily routine. Every day, he rises at 5:30 a.m., and every night he goes to bed by 9:00 p.m. Clemens manages to stick by his strict regimen regardless of the demands on his schedule. And--as it turns out--he might be right.

When we have a set time for resting our bodies every day, we are much more likely to have good, consistent control of our bodies' homeostasis. Maintaining stability, as we well know, is the way to long-term success in anything. Our health is no exception to this rule.

Giving our bodies an allotted time to rest and repair makes the act of recovery an easy habit, as well as letting it happen at the same time every single day.

If we hope to lead longer lives, we should follow the advice of Clemens and stick to a strict daily routine. In addition to cutting back on negative behaviors that are otherwise detrimental to our health--such as drinking, smoking, and overeating--having the consistency of a time to wake up and fall asleep gives us a calmer environment internally.

Stability, tranquility, and overall attempts to bring consistency to our perennially dynamic environment is, as Jacques Clemens has discovered, absolutely the way to a longer life--one that is filled with success and happiness.

Published on: Jul 14, 2016
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