Company Profile

No.78

Audrey Gelman

She created the leading co-working and community space for women—and inspired others to follow suit.

Audrey Gelman.
Location
New York, New York
Year Founded
2016
Twitter
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

Women today don’t just need a room of their own--they need a whole wing. That was the thinking when Audrey Gelman and Lauren Kassan named their concept for a women-focused networking and co-working space back in 2016. Since then, they’ve grown the Wing to eight locations, with three more opening before the end of year. That’ll put its membership roll at 15,000. The Wing expects to nearly double its locations in 2020 and create a digital membership for women everywhere. The company has raised $117.5 million in venture capital, mostly from women investors, and spends that money hiring other businesses founded and run by women as contractors and suppliers. --Christine Lagorio-Chafkin

No.79

Lisa Gelobter

After experiencing workplace bias, she created a software solution for reporting incidents and spotting patterns.

Lisa Gelobter
Location
Oakland, California
Year Founded
2017
Twitter
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

“If we can send a Tesla Roadster into outer space,” says Lisa Gelobter, co-founder of TEQuitable, “maybe we can use those same skills right here, on our own planet, to help the underserved, underrepresented, and underestimated.” Gelobter has worked as an executive at BET and as chief digital officer for the Department of Education in the Obama administration. But as a black woman in computer science--who has been mistaken more than once for the receptionist--she wanted to be doing more. Her creation, TEQuitable, is a digital platform that offers resources to employees for dealing with workplace bias, while serving up reports to management and using data to identify systemic problems. The company has raised $2 million in venture capital, making Gelobter one of only 40 black women to raise more than $1 million to date--a number so paltry, she says, “it makes me cry.” --Zoë Henry

No.80

Cate Luzio

Creating an inclusive space for women doesn’t mean you have to exclude anyone else, including men.

Cate Luzio.
Location
New York, New York
Year Founded
2018
Twitter
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

New York City-based Luminary founder and CEO Cate Luzio left her two-decade finance career at the end of 2018 to start Luminary, which differentiates itself from other female-first co-working spaces by emphasizing that membership is open to everyone (no applications; you can be an intern or a CEO), and that men are warmly welcomed in the space. “I had many male mentors,” Luzio says, “and if we're ever going to change all of the statistics we hear about [workplace inequality], we need men as part of the journey.” Since opening in a 15,000-square-foot space this January, Luminary has hosted 150 events and has grown to over 500 members, with 37 percent of members being women of color. --Anna Meyer

No.81

Amy Nelson

Motherhood spurred her to create an inclusive co-working company.

Amy Nelson.
Location
Seattle, Washington
Year Founded
2017
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

Amy Nelson, founder of the Riveter, turned to entrepreneurship when she realized that her corporate law career and young children just didn’t mix. “I was perceived very differently when I became pregnant,” she says. “I know women with kids are less likely to be promoted. Why was I buying into a system that was not buying into me?” When Nelson started attending startup events, the attendees were overwhelmingly male. She started looking for a community of women who were building startups, but she didn’t find a physical location that was hosting them. So she created one. Now, about 70 percent of the Riveter’s 2,000 members are women. The company has 10 locations, which have hosted events with speakers including Kamala Harris and Jane Fonda. Nelson says her first co-working spaces have already turned a profit, and she’s raised around $20 million in funding. --Kimberly Weisul

No.82

Leanne Pittsford

She started the most diverse networking community in tech—and built a tool to help companies hire from that network.

Leanne Pittsford.
Location
San Francisco, California
Year Founded
2012
Twitter
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

“The tech industry doesn’t have a pipeline problem--it has an access problem,” says Leanne Pittsford, the founder of Lesbians Who Tech, a community of 40,000 mostly LGBTQ techies with a mission to promote diversity in hiring. Her seven-year-old organization runs an annual tech conference (past speakers include Hillary Clinton, Stacey Abrams, and Laurene Powell Jobs), and this year it has branched out into building a digital recruiting and mentoring service, Include.io, that companies can use to find diverse talent from its network and track their diversity-and-inclusion efforts. Currently in beta, the product is being tested by 100 companies. “We have to shift the white-male-centric culture that Silicon Valley has built,” Pittsford says. --Christine Lagorio-Chafkin