Company Profile

No.71

Daniela Perdomo

She’s upending telecom infrastructure by allowing devices to connect without a cell network or Internet connection.

Daniela Perdomo.
Location
Brooklyn, New York
Year Founded
2012
Twitter
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

Daniela Perdomo was struck with the idea that would lead to goTenna in 2012, when she saw New York City residents struggle with poor mobile connectivity during Hurricane Sandy. She teamed up with her brother, Jorge, to create a small cellphone accessory--essentially an antenna--and a messaging app that together allow users to connect without a cell network or internet connection. While goTenna didn’t invent so-called mesh networking, it was the first to offer a viable commercial application of the technology. After several years of selling a consumer version, in 2018 goTenna launched a more advanced version for first responders, the military, and other professional users. The company, which has raised some $40 million in venture capital, doesn’t aim to replace existing communications networks but rather connect the so-called “last mile”--people who are left out because of their location, their economic status, or circumstances such as natural disasters. --Tom Foster

No.72

Steph Speirs

Through shared “solar gardens,” she’s bringing solar power to those who can’t afford or aren’t set up for their own panels.

Location
Cambridge, Massachusetts
Year Founded
2016
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

Most Americans can’t access solar energy: They live in apartment buildings, their roof faces the wrong way, or they just can’t afford to install the equipment. With Solstice, Steph Speirs’s Cambridge, Massachusetts-based startup, people sign up for a piece of a “community solar garden” in their area, and receive a credit on their energy bill for the power its panels generate. For the average customer, this results in a 10 percent discount, or $150 to $200 in savings per year, according to the company. Solar garden developers pay Solstice to sign up customers for them and handle billing. Solstice's revenue grew fivefold in the past year, Speirs says, and the company is planning expansion into more states. “The way we’ve gotten our electricity hasn’t changed in over a hundred years, but it will change in the next ten,” she says. “Ultimately, our obsession is: ‘how do we make this so easy and so affordable that everyone can do it?’” --Sophie Downes 

No.73

Melanie Stricklan

The 20-year Air Force vet’s startup analyzes satellite images in real time for smarter disaster response.

Melanie Stricklan.
Location
Austin, Texas
Year Founded
2016
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

When Hurricane Michael barreled into the Florida coastline last October, Melanie Stricklan's startup, Slingshot Aerospace, sprang into action. The Austin, Texas-based company, which uses artificial intelligence to analyze satellite images in real time, quickly determined the best places to assemble triages and the safest routes to hospitals, then delivered that information to FEMA and other disaster-response agencies. Before co-founding Slingshot, Stricklan spent more than 20 years in the U.S. Air Force, with much of that time spent as a technician on surveillance aircraft that collected reams of data. “The analysis would come back weeks or sometimes even a year later,” she says. “Faster results could have saved lives and produced very different outcomes.” Today, Slingshot’s A.I. can deliver results in minutes. The company’s insurance customers can make coverage determinations and get flood victims their money quickly; other clients include the Department of Homeland Security, NASA, and--yes--the Air Force. --Kevin J. Ryan

No.74

Andrea Thomaz

She's building robots that free nurses to focus on patient care.

Andrea Thomaz.
Location
Austin, Texas
Year Founded
2015
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

Hospitals across the country face an acute shortage of nurses, as well as cost pressures from the move to value-based care rather than a fee-for-service model. Andrea Thomaz's Austin-based company, Diligent Robotics, has developed a robot named Moxi that addresses these problems by freeing nurses to focus on patient care rather than, say, fetching supplies. In late 2018 and early 2019, four Texas hospitals ran monthlong beta tests with Moxi, and the cute, one-armed robot will begin rolling out to hospitals in earnest early next year. Thomaz also sees potential future applications for her company’s technology “in any industry where you can imagine a robot working indoors, side by side with people and doing materials-management tasks.” --Tom Foster

No.75

Melonee Wise

She’s making robots to tackle the tedious warehouse jobs that humans don’t want to do.

Location
San Jose, California
Year Founded
2014
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

From manufacturing to delivering a product to a shopper’s doorstep, the race for ever more efficiency is fierce. Melonee Wise’s autonomous, mobile robots make it easier to find, track, and move items in warehouses and factories. When they’re hauling things, the robots also gather useful data about everything around them. “We use that data to tell people about the inside of their facilities,” Wise explains. Understanding where there’s congestion, for instance, is powerful information for a warehouse manager. A mechanical-engineering PhD and founder of a previous robotics company, Wise has led San Jose, California-based Fetch Robotics since shortly after its founding in 2014. In July, Fetch raised $46 million in venture capital, bringing its total funding to $94 million. This year, it also landed a major new client, Universal Logistics, which uses Fetch-designed robots and cloud-based software to move car parts around the Nissan plant in Smyrna, Tennessee, the largest auto factory in North America. Fetch has several hundred robots deployed in 11 countries, and Wise says she's looking to expand in Europe. --Brit Morse