Founder Profile

Felicia Curcuru

Binti

Builds modern software for child welfare agencies.

Felicia Curcuru. Courtesy subject

Pandemic regulations have made it just about impossible for social workers to conduct child welfare home visits, and conventional reliance on paper files and outdated technology have made remote agency work that much harder. As a mobile, cloud-based solution, Binti has enabled social workers to transition to safe, effective remote work to ensure that more children find caring, permanent homes. Since its launch, Binti has scaled to serve over 120 agencies across 19 states and has enabled over 30,000 families to be approved to adopt or foster. On average, agencies using Binti approve 80 percent more families per year in 16 percent fewer days.

Industry
Software
Year Founded
2014
Location
Oakland, California
Leadership
Felicia Curcuru
Industry
The Platform Economy
Co-founder
Gabe Koplay
Data as of Publication on Sep 16, 2019
Inc. Honors
Inc. Female Founders
2019

Pandemic regulations have made it just about impossible for social workers to conduct child welfare home visits, and conventional reliance on paper files and outdated technology have made remote agency work that much harder. As a mobile, cloud-based solution, Binti has enabled social workers to transition to safe, effective remote work to ensure that more children find caring, permanent homes. Since its launch, Binti has scaled to serve over 120 agencies across 19 states and has enabled over 30,000 families to be approved to adopt or foster. On average, agencies using Binti approve 80 percent more families per year in 16 percent fewer days.

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Promise

Phaedra Ellis-Lamkins

Non-violent offenders under community supervision can use her app to keep track of court dates and stay out of jail.

After a career in startups and the music industry—one job was helping Prince secure his digital rights—Phaedra Ellis-Lamkins saw a loved one go through a complex and harrowing experience after missing a court date. He had bounty-hunters after him mainly because he didn’t know who to call to reschedule his appearance. Ellis-Lamkins teamed up with longtime lawyer Diana Frappier to remedy a flawed system that saw nonviolent offenders pay fines and await trial behind bars because they couldn’t afford bail or a lawyer. They called it Promise; its pitch was to take over parts of the local criminal-justice apparatus and provide individuals with an app and automated check-in process that keeps track of court dates and paperwork. Before even graduating from startup incubator Y Combinator in 2018, this audacious little company had raised $3 million in funding from the likes of Jay-Z’s Roc Nation and First Round Capital. Recently it has been working with Alameda County in California, as well as localities in Kentucky and North Dakota, and appearance rates--essentially, showing up when you’re supposed to in court--have increased by nearly 25 percent. “The system is fundamentally broken based on race and class,” Ellis-Lamkins says. She’s aiming to even the field, and help fix a system that penalizes those without means. --Christine Lagorio-Chafkin

Year Founded
2018
Location
Oakland, California
Industry
The Platform Economy
Co-founder
Diana Frappier
Data as of Publication on Sep 16, 2019
Inc. Honors
Inc. Female Founders
2019

After a career in startups and the music industry—one job was helping Prince secure his digital rights—Phaedra Ellis-Lamkins saw a loved one go through a complex and harrowing experience after missing a court date. He had bounty-hunters after him mainly because he didn’t know who to call to reschedule his appearance. Ellis-Lamkins teamed up with longtime lawyer Diana Frappier to remedy a flawed system that saw nonviolent offenders pay fines and await trial behind bars because they couldn’t afford bail or a lawyer. They called it Promise; its pitch was to take over parts of the local criminal-justice apparatus and provide individuals with an app and automated check-in process that keeps track of court dates and paperwork. Before even graduating from startup incubator Y Combinator in 2018, this audacious little company had raised $3 million in funding from the likes of Jay-Z’s Roc Nation and First Round Capital. Recently it has been working with Alameda County in California, as well as localities in Kentucky and North Dakota, and appearance rates--essentially, showing up when you’re supposed to in court--have increased by nearly 25 percent. “The system is fundamentally broken based on race and class,” Ellis-Lamkins says. She’s aiming to even the field, and help fix a system that penalizes those without means. --Christine Lagorio-Chafkin

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Teach-Now Graduate School of Education

Dr. Emily Feistritzer

She’s making it easier to be a better teacher.

Dr. Emily Feistritzer. Courtesy subject

Emily Feistritzer, a 78-year-old former nun, learned as far back as the 1970s that she didn’t like traditional teaching methods, like talking at students as if she were the expert, and organizing learning around planned lessons. A more collaborative approach, she came to believe, was far better. She founded two education foundations that sought to conduct and distribute the most up-to-date research in the field, and, in 2011, she founded Teach-Now, which trains and certifies teachers online. “We focus on preparing tomorrow's teachers for tomorrow's learning world,” she says. “so that the program will never be old.” This year the Washington, D.C.-based Teach-Now started offering master's certifications targeted at programs that are growing quickly, such as early childhood, multilingual, and special needs education. Since its founding, Teach-Now has enrolled 4,000 aspiring teachers in 125 countries. “I owe everything to my mother,” says Feistritzer. But of course she does: “She was a teacher.” --Anna Meyer

Year Founded
2011
Location
Washington, District of Columbia
Industry
The Platform Economy
Data as of Publication on Sep 16, 2019
Inc. Honors
Inc. Female Founders
2019

Emily Feistritzer, a 78-year-old former nun, learned as far back as the 1970s that she didn’t like traditional teaching methods, like talking at students as if she were the expert, and organizing learning around planned lessons. A more collaborative approach, she came to believe, was far better. She founded two education foundations that sought to conduct and distribute the most up-to-date research in the field, and, in 2011, she founded Teach-Now, which trains and certifies teachers online. “We focus on preparing tomorrow's teachers for tomorrow's learning world,” she says. “so that the program will never be old.” This year the Washington, D.C.-based Teach-Now started offering master's certifications targeted at programs that are growing quickly, such as early childhood, multilingual, and special needs education. Since its founding, Teach-Now has enrolled 4,000 aspiring teachers in 125 countries. “I owe everything to my mother,” says Feistritzer. But of course she does: “She was a teacher.” --Anna Meyer

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Mahmee

Melissa Hanna

Her health-technology platform puts mothers first.

Melissa Hanna. Courtesy subject

“When I was younger, I swore that I was never going to work in this field,” says Melissa Hanna. “I didn’t want to work in my mother’s shadow.” That’s understandable: Linda Hanna pioneered the world-class maternity programs at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and Kaiser Permanente. But once there was an opportunity to “digitize her work,” says Hanna, they knew they could fundamentally change the structure of health care in this country. Mahmee, recently backed by Mark Cuban and Serena Williams, describes itself as a "data-driven maternal and infant health tech company”; it pulls a mother and her baby’s health records together so the burden isn’t on them to keep physicians on the same page about their care. Families get a personalized dashboard, and physicians can identify critical-care issues like post-partum depression sooner. Says Hanna: “We become that trusted resource where moms can let us know what’s going on.” --Jill Krasny

Year Founded
2014
Location
Los Angeles, California
Industry
The Platform Economy
Co-founders
Linda Hanna, Sunny Walia
Twitter
Data as of Publication on Sep 16, 2019
Inc. Honors
Inc. Female Founders
2019

“When I was younger, I swore that I was never going to work in this field,” says Melissa Hanna. “I didn’t want to work in my mother’s shadow.” That’s understandable: Linda Hanna pioneered the world-class maternity programs at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and Kaiser Permanente. But once there was an opportunity to “digitize her work,” says Hanna, they knew they could fundamentally change the structure of health care in this country. Mahmee, recently backed by Mark Cuban and Serena Williams, describes itself as a "data-driven maternal and infant health tech company”; it pulls a mother and her baby’s health records together so the burden isn’t on them to keep physicians on the same page about their care. Families get a personalized dashboard, and physicians can identify critical-care issues like post-partum depression sooner. Says Hanna: “We become that trusted resource where moms can let us know what’s going on.” --Jill Krasny

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Eventbrite

Julia Hartz

She's one of the few female founders in tech who's taken her company public.

Julia Hartz. Courtesy subject

Julia Hartz has had a rollercoaster ride of a year. In September 2018, the co-founder and CEO of ticketing platform Eventbrite took her company public in a wildly successful IPO that raised more than $240 million and valued her company at $1.75 billion. Last year, the company helped about 800,000 creators produce nearly four million events across 170 countries. Its market cap had soared to more than $2.4 billion when its momentum abruptly halted in March: Eventbrite missed Wall Street’s earnings estimate in its first quarterly report. “That’s a straightforward thing for the company to understand,” says a matter-of-fact Hartz. For her and her company, being public means getting back to basics. “We’ve almost rediscovered our founding DNA,” she says. “That’s been a great springboard for us.” --Guadalupe Gonzalez

Year Founded
2006
Location
San Francisco, California
Industry
The Platform Economy
Co-founders
Kevin Hartz, Renaud Visage
Data as of Publication on Sep 16, 2019
Inc. Honors
Inc. Female Founders
2019

Julia Hartz has had a rollercoaster ride of a year. In September 2018, the co-founder and CEO of ticketing platform Eventbrite took her company public in a wildly successful IPO that raised more than $240 million and valued her company at $1.75 billion. Last year, the company helped about 800,000 creators produce nearly four million events across 170 countries. Its market cap had soared to more than $2.4 billion when its momentum abruptly halted in March: Eventbrite missed Wall Street’s earnings estimate in its first quarterly report. “That’s a straightforward thing for the company to understand,” says a matter-of-fact Hartz. For her and her company, being public means getting back to basics. “We’ve almost rediscovered our founding DNA,” she says. “That’s been a great springboard for us.” --Guadalupe Gonzalez

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