Company Profile

Fitbit

Why Fitbit's latest successes have nothing to do with fitness trackers

Fitbit co-founder and CEO James Park.
3-Year Growth
5,057%
Industry
Health
Location
San Francisco, California
Leadership
James Park
Year Founded
2007
Company Size
501-1,000 employees
Inc. 5000 Rankings
No. 53 (2015)
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

It hasn't been a great year for high-tech gadget makers, as Fitbit and GoPro can attest. Yet both are financially outperforming other tech companies that went public when they did, according to EY benchmarks, and pursuing a remarkable rate of innovation. Fitbit's success is due to its breaking into a smartwatch market that could amount to $10 billion globally. The San Francisco company, which CEO James Park co-founded with CTO Eric Friedman, has been scooping up rival smartwatch makers and pursuing patents related to more advanced biometrics tracking, such as whether a device wearer is properly hydrated. In December, Fitbit partnered with medical-device maker Medtronic on an app that tracks physical activity and glucose for diabetes patients. "People might perceive us as kind of a nice-to-have," Park told investors this year. "What I'm most excited about is really transforming Fitbit into a must-have." --Victoria Finkle

GoPro

GoPro wants to capture moments (and improve them too)

GoPro founder and CEO Nick Woodman.
3-Year Growth
1,429%
Industry
Consumer Products & Services
Location
San Mateo, California
Leadership
Nicholas Woodman
Year Founded
2004
Company Size
501-1,000 employees
Inc. 5000 Rankings
No. 326 (2014)
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

A picture might be worth a thousand words, but wearable-camera maker GoPro wants to ensure those stories get told. That's why, after a bumpy year, CEO Nick Woodman is emphasizing software. His San Mateo, California, company has recently introduced or improved several products to help customers edit videos on the fly, store them in the cloud, and, of course, make them in the first place. "GoPro got started in the packaging," says IFI analyst Larry Cady. "But now they've started patenting around more of the electronics, like image processing and network communications." --Victoria Finkle

Nutanix

How this $445 million company keeps Toyota and the Defense Department happy

Nutanix co-founder and CEO Dheeraj Pandey.
3-Year Growth
3,566%
Industry
Software
Location
San Jose, California
Leadership
Dheeraj Pandey
Year Founded
2009
Company Size
1,001-5,000 employees
Inc. 5000 Rankings
No. 86 (2016)
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

This San Jose, California-based data-storage provider has more than 5,300 customers, including Toyota, Best Buy, Hyundai, and the U.S. Defense Department. And it's retained them by consolidating servers and storage systems into a single platform, earning it a standout reputation for "ease of use, simplified management, and no-disruptive capacity," according to a 2016 Forrester report. Founded in 2009, Nutanix recorded $445 million in annual revenue by its September 2016 IPO--and it got there with a focus on both customers and employees. As its co-founder and CEO, Dheeraj Pandey, explains: "Ambition and attention to detail have to go hand in hand."

Square

How Jack Dorsey's Square has succeeded where Twitter struggles

3-Year Growth
523%
Industry
Financial Services
Location
San Francisco, California
Leadership
Jack Dorsey
Year Founded
2009
Company Size
1,001-5,000 employees
Inc. 5000 Rankings
No. 763 (2016)
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

It's easy to miss given all the trouble plaguing Jack Dorsey's other company, Twitter, but Square has had a remarkably good run of late. When Dorsey launched Square eight years ago with co-founder Jim McKelvey, the San Francisco company focused on selling credit card payment systems to small businesses. But now, Square's ever-popular gadget is just one of its many products. "Today, sellers come to Square for much more than payments and hardware," Dorsey told investors earlier this year.

Square is becoming, in other words, a one-stop shop for small businesses: You can get invoices and payroll services there, or even speedy cash through its lending program, Square Capital, which has extended $1.3 billion since its 2014 launch. And Square has even gotten into the on-demand food-delivery business by buying Caviar. New products launched since 2014 now account for a full quarter of the company's adjusted revenue. As John T. Williams, an analyst at Compass Point Research & Trading, puts it, "A lot of the business lines they've added tie in very nicely with Square's original product." --Victoria Finkle

 

Box

How Box grows by staying small

Box co-founder and CEO Aaron Levie.
3-Year Growth
489%
Industry
Software
Location
Redwood City, California
Leadership
Aaron Levie
Year Founded
2005
Company Size
1,001-5,000 employees
Inc. 5000 Rankings
No. 919 (2015), No. 295 (2011), No. 152 (2010)
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

This eleven-year-old file-sharing and content-management company was Inc.'s 2013 Company of the Year--and now it's made the 2017 Founders 10 list by keeping its focus narrow. With more than 71,000 enterprise customers, the Redwood City, California-based company innovates by carefully picking its targets and listening to a select group of customers. "We have a very fast feedback loop with that small set of customers," says co-founder and CEO Aaron Levie. "And as they adopt the next innovation, it will ripple through the customer base."