Company Profile

Glam Seamless

This company is putting hair extensions in the limelight

Industry
Consumer Products & Services
Location
Hoboken, New Jersey
Year Founded
2012
Company Size
1-10 employees
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

A few days before Halloween on 2012, armed with less than $1,000 and a site built using a free website builder, Alexandra Cristin White, then 23 years old, officially launched her online business, Glam Seamless. White's company sells tape-in natural hair extensions for women. Sales have grown from $55,000 in 2014 to over $2.5 million two years later. "I think the reason why the company has been so successful is because I never focused on the numbers," White says. "I never focused on 'Oh, I need to hit this goal.' I mean, numbers are important, for sure, but I think what is more important is surveying your customers and really listening to what they want." Another factor that helped? She didn't need to pay office space. White and her team worked remotely on the business during the first three years of the company. They would meet on coffee shops or co-working spaces when needed. Now Glam Seamless has its offices and a "hair room" in Hoboken, New Jersey. White explains that she chose to enter the tape-in extensions market because it wasn’t as saturated as the clip-on alternative. A few lessons on SEO and a YouTube channel later, Glam Seamless became one of the top players in the space. "In the day of internet and e-commerce, anything is really possible," says White, now 28. "You don't need an investor to start, you don't need a big office, you don't need anything. You just need the grit, the determination and passion for whatever you're doing."

Envested

Your employees want to do good. This company's here to help

Industry
Software
Location
New York City, New York
Year Founded
2015
Company Size
1-10 employees
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

Businesses are increasingly recognizing that charitable giving and volunteer opportunities are an important way to attract and engage employees. But few resources exist to easily organize and track those activities in one place. Envested, a New York City-based startup, wants to change that. The software company makes it easy for employees to get involved in charity projects and launch their own, as well as reducing the time businesses need to spend on attendant administrative tasks. Isa Watson, a former chemist at Pfizer and executive at JPMorganChase--and an accomplished classical pianist on the side--founded Envested in 2015. The five-person company began generating revenue through software subscriptions at the end of last year, and projects revenue to rise to more than $700,000 in 2017. It has raised $760,000 in funding from investors including Newark Venture Partners, which also recently accepted the startup into its accelerator program. Envested currently has about 100 local nonprofit groups on its roster. So far, its software is proving to be a hit: An average of 50-65 percent of customers' employees use it, four to six times the adoption rate for products from Envested's competitors. --Doug Cantor

CrowdAI

This startup wants to help you power driverless cars

Industry
IT Services
Location
Mountain View, California
Year Founded
2016
Company Size
1-10 employees
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

Machines can learn, but not without a little help. The deep-learning algorithms that enable cars to drive themselves and smartphones to render speech as text need massive amounts of so-called training data to make sense of all the variations they encounter--for instance, what a car looks like from different angles, what a word sounds like in different accents. To the founders of CrowdAI, the solution to this deep learning problem was more deep learning. While other companies generate training data by paying armies of workers to tag images, CrowdAI’s software is able to categorize 70 percent to 99 percent of what it sees, bringing in humans only to assist with the hard stuff.

CEO Devaki Raj was working at Google on the energy team when she and her two co-founders realized a lot of other companies that lack Google’s resources are nonetheless going to need their own computer vision capabilities. They started CrowdAI to cater to those needs, with an initial focus on autonomous vehicles and satellite imagery. (* The 2016 revenue figure cited here reflects the company's first two sales closed during Y Combinator, not its full-year sales.) “For us, the marriage of the two is where we think we can find a very large place,” says Raj. --Jeff Bercovici

Away

This $48 million luggage startup has big plans for your next trip

Location
New York City, New York
Year Founded
2015
Company Size
51-200 employees
Twitter
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

Steph Korey and Jen Rubio are a match made in airport heaven. After cutting their teeth at the direct-to-consumer juggernaut Warby Parker, the two young entrepreneurs turned their attention to the much-maligned travel business and launched Away. Founded in 2015, the direct-to-consumer luggage company aims to make getting out of town both stylish and cost effective. "The idea sprang from a broken suitcase," says Rubio, whose baggage malfunction turned a typical trek through an airport in Zurich into a nightmare travel story. "I did what a bunch of people our age do. I went on Facebook and asked: 'I need new luggage. Have any recommendations?'" The responses were tepid. That's when she realized the opportunity for Away and attempted to sell Korey on the idea, who at the time was at Columbia University elbow-deep in a dissertation about the potential for the direct-to-consumer business model. "There was definitely a need in the market for something that was well designed and well priced and had a thoughtful brand around it," says Rubio. The company, which has sold more than 100,000 suitcases, booked $12 million in sales in its first year and expects to quadruple that figure in 2017. --Diana Ransom

TrackMaven

Meet the 20-something founders switching up Microsoft's marketing strategy

Industry
Advertising & Marketing
Location
Washington, District of Columbia
Year Founded
2012
Company Size
51-200 employees
Twitter
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

TrackMaven, a marketing analytics software company founded in 2012 by then 21-year-old Allen Gannett, is used by Martha Stewart Living Media, the NBA, Microsoft, MailChimp, and other companies. Gannett, who was working as the chief marketing officer for a software-as-service company upon graduating George Washington University, grew tired of collecting data to fill out spreadsheets and crunch numbers to measure how the company's marketing strategy was working. He had to use about a dozen tools to track press mentions, measure social media engagement, and analyze competitors’ marketing strategies. He created arudimentary system in Excel to automate his data collection that could show companies how their marketing strategies were helping, or hurting, their brand.Gannett’s system was not pretty, but it enabled the company to track how its TV, social, digital, and traditional media campaigns drove traffic to the site and how those campaigns affect sales and business leads.

Realizing the potential of what he had created, Gannett quit to start a company and transform his Excel system into software with a streamlined interface. His old boss became the company’s first investor. In total, Track Maven has raised $26 million in venture capital. In 2016, the company generated than $6.7 million in annual revenue, up from more than $5 million in 2015. Gannett projects TrackMaven will continue its breakneck pace for 2017, and in ten years, it may well go public, he adds. After starting the company in D.C. by himself, the now 26-year-old now has 51 employees. --Will Yakowicz