Company Profile

No.12

Jen Rubio

She reinvented the suitcase and then sold a million of them. Now her company is worth $1.4 billion.

Jen Rubio.
Location
New York, New York
Year Founded
2015
Twitter
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

After being told in college that she couldn’t get into marketing without an MBA, Jen Rubio struck out on her own, pioneering social-media strategies for a number of brands until she landed at Warby Parker, which disrupted the eyewear market. In 2015, she and fellow Warby alum Steph Korey did the same thing to the luggage industry by launching Away. Beautiful design and a focus on customer interaction gave Away’s luggage Instagram rocket fuel, and by 2019 the company was valued at $1.4 billion. Revenue in 2019 is projected at $300 million—but the big project is international expansion. The company is eyeing China, where travel is exploding, and plans to add 50 new stores to its existing seven by 2022. Away is also expanding product lines, with the goal being, as Rubio says, “to completely transform the entire travel experience.” --Christine Lagorio-Chafkin

No.13

Jaime Schmidt

She sold her personal care business. Now she invests in ventures of underrepresented entrepreneurs.

Jaime Schmidt.
Location
Portland, Oregon
Year Founded
2017
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

After selling her personal care business, Schmidt’s Naturals, to Unilever in 2017, Jaime Schmidt was besieged by aspiring founders seeking advice. She could only do so many coffee dates. So she and Chris Cantino, her husband and business partner, decided to spend some of their Unilever money helping undersupported entrepreneurs—women and people of color--along the trajectory to success. Their first venture, the investment fund Color, launched last year and has backed, among others, the nut butter company Wild Friends and Bubble, an online marketplace for healthy foods. Then, in June, came Supermaker, a media platform that publishes articles about emerging brands with diverse founders as well as workplace trends and advice for both entrepreneurs and employees. “A big part of our success at Schmidt’s was the storytelling we did for the brand,” she says. Color and Supermaker are also partnering on a program of quarterly grants to help female and nonbinary founders. “It wasn’t as sophisticated when I started in 2010,” says Schmidt. “Now people are really serious about turning their passions into profits.” --Leigh Buchanan

No.14

Christina Stembel

With a lot of pluck, she has boot-strapped her way into the male-dominated flower-delivery industry.

Christina Stembel.
Location
San Francisco, California
Year Founded
2010
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

Christina Stembel didn’t start Farmgirl Flowers because she loved flowers. She was out to challenge an outdated, male-dominated industry. With just $49,000 of her own money, she knew she had only one shot at success. "I wanted to go big, I wanted it to get to hundreds of millions, a billion dollars,” she says. “So it needed to be a big industry. It also needed to be untapped." Flower arrangements and delivery checked those boxes. Since its founding in 2010, her online floral delivery service has grown roughly 50 percent annually, bringing in $23 million in revenue last year. Sales should reach $33 million in 2019. Now, her San Francisco-based company, which has 145 employees, is focused on national expansion. “If we wanted to be a very small regional company, we could still get it to probably $100 million,” she says. “But we're playing the long game.” --Brit Morse

No.15

Holly Thaggard

She's leading the mission to end skin cancer with her line of sunscreens.

Holly Thaggard.
Location
San Antonio, Texas
Year Founded
2009
Twitter
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

After a close friend was diagnosed with melanoma, Holly Thaggard--teacher, harpist, mom--found her true calling as a sunscreen evangelist and entrepreneur. In 2009, she founded Supergoop!, which makes mineral sunscreens (in all skin tones) and other products free of harmful chemicals. But Supergoop!’s true value lies in its ultimate goal: “I've been so laser-focused on making sure everything we do ladders up to our mission, which is to stop the epidemic of skin cancer,” says Thaggard. “I don’t think I’ve taken the time to think about much else.” And yet, she’s built the brand into a shining success, with $40 million in revenue last year, retail partnerships with FAO Schwarz, Nordstrom, and Sephora, and a recently-opened New York office in addition to its San Antonio headquarters. To further that mission, Supergoop! donated 1,000 pumps of Supergoop! to schools across America last year and works on skin cancer issues with the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. --Tim Crino

No.16

Trinity Mouzon Wofford

Her line of organic masks and superfood powders is poised for national distribution.

Location
New York, New York
Year Founded
2017
Twitter
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

If the Instagram-fueled wellness boom made of “Moon Juice” dusts and diet teas feels like outer space, Trinity Mouzon Wofford is trying to bring things back down to earth. In 2016, the Millennial-minded founder began formulating superfood-boosted powders with powerful anti-inflammatory turmeric that could be mixed with any liquid. A year later, New York City stores began selling her Original Golde Tonic for $29. Soon, Goop, Urban Outfitters, and Sephora.com were calling. Today, Golde’s five powders and facemasks are sold by about 100 stores nationwide, and the company is poised for broader distribution. It’s a strong start for the tiny, bootstrapped operation, which consists of Wofford, her boyfriend, Issey Kobori, and just one part-time employee working out of the couple’s Brooklyn, New York, home. --Christine Lagorio-Chafkin