Founder Profile

MilkRun

Julia Niiro

Her startup brings fresh, local food to the doorsteps of consumers and high-end restaurants.

Julia Niiro.
Company Information
Year Founded
2017
Location
Portland, Oregon
Industry
Food Revolutionaries
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

Julia Niiro’s two-year MilkRun harnesses an old-fashioned idea--the milkman--to solve two key problems of the local food movement: distribution and low pay. MilkRun brings all the food groups--dairy, produce, bread, and meat, and even locally produced pet food--to the doorsteps of customers and high-end restaurants in Portland, Oregon. Niiro hires farmers and ranchers to make deliveries themselves; cutting out the middleman allows Niiro to increase their take to 70 percent of each dollar spent on food. (In a traditional supply chain, producers receive only 10 percent.) “I want to make it as easy to buy from local farmers as it is to book a stay in someone’s house or call a ride,” Niiro said in a recent TEDx Talk. “If it was easier to buy better tasting, fresher food directly from your local farmers than it was to go to a local supermarket after a long day, wouldn’t you?” --Hannah Wallace

Green Zebra Grocery

Lisa Sedlar

She's making healthy food as easy to find as the local convenience store.

Lisa Sedlar.
Company Information
Year Founded
2012
Location
Portland, Oregon
Industry
Food Revolutionaries
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

Lisa Sedlar was living in Boulder, Colorado, in the mid-aughts when she’d see fit college students returning from mountain bike rides grabbing Big Gulps and Snickers at the mini-mart. This disconnect inspired an idea: Why not launch a healthy corner store, where kale and farro salads and fresh pressed juices were on offer instead of junky snacks? The idea percolated during her seven-year stint as CEO of New Seasons, a naturalish grocery store chain in Portland, Oregon, and in 2012, she left to launch Green Zebra Grocery. The company--named after an heirloom tomato--was built to make healthy food accessible and convenient for everybody. There are three Green Zebras in Portland--a fourth opens this fall--and Sedlar is about to close a $10 million Series B funding round as she explores potential locations in Seattle, L.A., and the Bay Area. --Hannah Wallace

Health-Ade

Daina Trout

In 2018, her kombucha became the fastest-growing refrigerated beverage in the U.S.

Daina Trout.
Company Information
Year Founded
2012
Location
Los Angeles, California
Industry
Food Revolutionaries
Co-founders
Vanessa Dew, Justin Trout
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

In 2012, Daina Trout was working for a big corporation and feeling like a number. With her boyfriend and best friend, she set out to found a company--and settled on what was already brewing on her kitchen table: kombucha. An avid fermenter who’d studied nutrition, she found a niche almost immediately: high-quality fermented tea infused with herbs, cold-pressed organic juice, and spices. Breaking into the refrigerated-beverage case was no simple task, but in 2018, Health-Ade became the fastest-growing refrigerated beverage brand in the U.S. It’s in 26,000 stores and has 220 employees, mostly in and around Los Angeles, where the company brews the tea in 2.5-gallon glass jugs, all in its own facility. --Christine Lagorio-Chafkin

CapWay

Sheena Allen

She is helping people without bank accounts enter the financial system—and go cashless.

Sheena Allen.
Company Information
Year Founded
2016
Location
New York, New York
Industry
Money Movers
Twitter
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

Sheena Allen grew up in a one-bank town in rural Mississippi, watching friends and relatives rely on expensive check cashers and payday lenders. Now she’s running a fintech company aiming to help her community--and some of the 32.6 million other underbanked American households--enter the financial mainstream. In 2016, Allen founded app-maker CapWay as part educator, part bank account. It sells financial education materials to colleges and lets individual users check their account balances and receive transaction alerts. Next up is a debit card, which Allen says has generated a waiting list of 10,000 people. Once launched this fall, the card could help CapWay work with a big new potential source of business: digital subscription services and big online sellers--enterprises that take only electronic payments and that want to bring more potential customers into the cashless economy. Allen says she’s currently talking to several “well-known” retailers and online service providers about how CapWay can help them better identify and work with low- and middle-income communities. “They’re either going cashless,” she says, “or they’re realizing that to continue scaling, they’re going to need an audience that has not always had access to plastic.” --Maria Aspan

Roger

Cathrine Andersen

Her software helps businesses shave time from accounting tasks.

Cathrine Andersen.
Company Information
Year Founded
2016
Location
San Francisco, California
Industry
Money Movers
Co-founder
Christian Rasmussen
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

Three years ago, shortly after launching accounting automation startup Roger, Cathrine Andersen and co-founder Christian Rasmussen were pitching a bank on why it should recommend Roger to its small-business customers. The bankers laughed, saying it was “cute” that two 20-somethings thought they could change the way banks work. A year later, the bank reached out to the co-founders, saying many of their clients had linked their bank accounts to Roger’s tool. “They came crawling back,” Andersen says. “We’re getting them a lot of new business.” (The company doesn’t reveal revenue, but Andersen says it is growing by more than 30 percent a month.) Roger works on top of accounting software like Quickbooks and Xero, automatically pushing data through the system to save businesses time on tasks like paying bills, scanning receipts, and bookkeeping. One area in which she hopes to make more progress is encouraging other women to go into fintech. “There are too few,” she says. Andersen and Rasmussen previously co-founded cloud-based collaboration software company Assemblage, moving to the United States from Denmark after Cisco acquired the company in 2014. “We thought, if we can do that together for three years,” says Andersen, “why not start another thing?" --Graham Winfrey