Company Profile

Karuna Health

A software platform maker that automates common care-management tasks so that care providers can better serve patients.

Karuna Health co-founders Yasyf Mohamedali (left) and Joe Kahn.
Industry
Software
Year Founded
2018
Company Size
1-10 employees
Data as of Publication on Apr 14, 2019
Company Description

The year before leaving his home in Cape Town, South Africa, for Harvard, Joe Kahn got sick. "I was on my back for about a month," says Kahn, who has never been satisfactorily diagnosed. "I never really got better." He went to Harvard anyway, and found himself bounced around the U.S. health care system, unable to get answers. Feeling frustrated and isolated, Kahn realized that millions of people were even less equipped to navigate such complexity. He and Yasyf Mohamedali, an MIT student, raised $1.3 million from First Round Capital to launch Karuna Health, in San Francisco. The platform is used by patient-care managers--who may be employed by social service agencies, community-based organizations, and others that work with Medicaid recipients--to help those coping with educational, financial, social, or logistical barriers to health care. All patient communications--scheduling appointments, arranging transportation for appointments, checking on worrisome symptoms--take place through the platform. Patients can send and receive messages through any media, including SMS, email, text, phone, and WhatsApp. "For the care team, it is like a shared inbox to manage every single touch point with patients," says Kahn. "For the patient, it is like texting a friend." --Leigh Buchanan

 

 

Love Your Melon

An apparel brand that gives 50 percent of its profits to organizations helping to fight pediatric cancer.

Industry
Retail
Location
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Leadership
Zachary Quinn
Year Founded
2012
Company Size
11-50 employees
Data as of Publication on Apr 14, 2019
Company Description

When Zachary Quinn and Brian Keller borrowed $3,500 from family and friends to manufacture 400 hats during an entrepreneurship class in college, their professors “were a little freaked out.” But the “buy one, give one” business model was already well established, and the founders’ plan--to sell comfortable, fashionable beanies that would stand up to the Minnesota winters, and, for each hat sold, to donate one to a child fighting cancer--took off. The company enlisted an army of college students to deliver hats, and within a year had reached its goal of giving hats to all 45,000 kids with cancer in the U.S. Now, Love Your Melon also donates half its profits to cancer-related nonprofit partners. The business is inherently seasonal, so the founders are brimming with new ideas to expand their philanthropic efforts and revenue streams. The company now sells scarves, shawls, blankets, and other apparel--”anything that you think of when you want to stay warm,” says Quinn--and recently introduced a line of beanies made from recycled plastic bottles. A physical store in Minneapolis, which opened last fall, is also a studio and event space; the founders are considering pop-up locations in other cities. -- Sophie Downes

Inc. Honors
Inc. 5000
No. 106 (2018)

Mammoth Biosciences

Uses its own DETECTR system to detect genes associated with disease. It joins a family of CRISPR systems developed by Mammoth to provide enhanced genome editing for industries like health care, research, agriculture, and even biodefense.

Industry
Health Products
Location
San Francisco, California
Leadership
Trevor Martin
Year Founded
2018
Company Size
11-50 employees
Data as of Publication on Apr 14, 2019
Company Description

Molecular diagnostics--scanning DNA for genes associated with disease--is the most accurate method of early disease detection, but usually requires large, expensive laboratory facilities and trained experts, slowing results. Mammoth’s DETECTR tool was built to bypass many of those obstacles to rapid testing, and in January, the company reconfigured DETECTR to make the first CRISPR-based test for Covid-19. The test is a low-cost option that produces highly accurate results in just 30 minutes--instead of the 24-hour minimum required by many other tests.

Inc. Honors
Inc. Best in Business
Health Products (2020)

Modern Fertility

Sells at-home blood-test kits for women to monitor their fertility.

Modern Fertility co-founders Afton Vechery (L) and Carly Leahy.
Industry
Health
Year Founded
2017
Company Size
11-50 employees
Data as of Publication on Apr 14, 2019
Company Description

After a stint in private equity, where she did due diligence on in vitro fertilization clinics, Afton Vechery knew why infertility rates are rising: Women are choosing to have children later. The problem, she thought, was women didn't get relevant fertility data until it was too late. So she envisioned a company that gives women a snapshot of their fertility while speaking like "an ob-gyn who also happens to be your best friend." (For that voice, she needed co-founder Carly Leahy, a branding whiz who helped launch Uber Eats.) In 2017, they launched Modern Fertility, which charges $159 for at-home blood tests that help women assess, say, how many eggs they have and how close they may be to menopause. Customers receive a full report along with a free one-on-one consultation with a nurse; similar tests at a clinic can run as high as $1,500 if they're not covered by insurance. "I wish there was a magic test to tell women exactly when they should have kids," says Vechery. Until there is, her company will democratize that data. --Lindsay Blakely

NPHub

Offers graduate nursing students matchmaking services to secure clinical rotations.

Co-founder and CEO of NPHub Krish Chopra.
Industry
Business Products & Services
Year Founded
2017
Company Size
1-10 employees
Data as of Publication on Apr 14, 2019
Company Description

Prior to NPHub, Chopra founded a company called United Medical Rotations, which specialized in matching medical students who received their degrees in the Caribbean with clinical rotations in the United States. Through that venture, Chopra realized that nursing students in the U.S. also needed help finding clinical rotations. He backed his way into a significant problem: U.S. universities don't always offer formal medical rotations for nursing-degree candidates. Nor are nursing educators paid for taking these students on. That gave rise to NPHub, which today works with 340 instructors across 23 states. While the company has helped place roughly 2,000 nursing students with instructors to date, the goal is to work directly with universities and expand to all 50 states. --Malak Saleh