Company Profile

No.43

Loren Brill

She makes vegan cookie dough that's safe for most consumers with food sensitivities.

Loren Brill.
Location
New York, New York
Year Founded
2011
Twitter
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

When Loren Brill was 22, she learned she had Stage II cancer, and started monitoring how certain foods made her feel. Heavily processed ones zapped her energy. She was able to find healthy alternatives to most--except for her favorite baked goods. So in 2011, she began making cookie dough without ingredients like refined sugar and flour, and consumers’ growing appetites for healthier alternatives helped Sweet Loren’s take off. In 2018, Brill released a vegan, kosher, non-GMO, gluten- and nut-free version; sales boomed. That August, she discontinued her original recipe to focus on the one that the greatest number of people could enjoy. Sweet Loren’s, which is on the shelves in more than 10,000 supermarkets, booked $6.4 million in revenue last year and clocked in at No. 114 on this year’s Inc. 5000. “I can turn this negative thing that happened to me into a positive,” says Brill. “Nothing feels better than reaching millions of people and making them happy.” --Emily Canal

No.44

Julia Collins

Zume Pizza's co-founder aims to produce snack food using regenerative-farming techniques.

Julia Collins.
Year Founded
2018
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

Julia Collins’s understanding of food took a great leap forward in 2009, when she spent six months living on a farm in southern Italy. “I learned the importance of these whole food systems that are integrated and diverse,” she says. “I looked at the people who lived there. There was zero incidence of diabetes and obesity. Well into their 80s, people were eating with joy and pleasure.” In 2015, she co-founded Zume Pizza, which ran an automated food delivery platform and has raised $423 million. Collins’s next venture combines that experience with her agricultural awakening to produce foods using so-called regenerative farming techniques. Her startup, Planet FWD, aims to reverse climate change by using agricultural practices that sequester carbon, de-acidify the ocean, encourage healthy soil biology, use less water, and produce less waste. The company’s first products—healthy snack foods and noodles—will hit the market in early 2020. --Kimberly Weisul

No.45

Ariane Daguin

Her 35-year-old gourmet meat company anticipated--and shaped--the sustainable, locavore trends today.

Ariane Daguin.
Location
Union, New Jersey
Year Founded
1985
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

In 1985, a young Frenchwoman living in New York City cofounded a small operation to sell duck livers and other exotic proteins to gourmet restaurants. Thirty-five years later, Ariane Daguin still entirely owns that business, D’Artagnan, which she has built into a profitable, $132 million organic-meat distributor with a near-national network of small farmers and artisanal suppliers. D’Artagnan was one of the first companies to introduce organic free-range chickens to American chefs and home cooks. It also anticipated, and shaped, the locavore movement now sweeping through our food system. “My animals have one bad day,” is how Daguin, now 61, sums up the philosophy of humane, sustainable farming underlying her business. Along the way, she overcame a wrenching breakup with her co-founder and ongoing regulatory battles over foie gras, the controversial and luxurious duck livers with which she launched her company. But neither challenge has stopped Daguin from building her revenue, which she’s aiming to double in the next five years, or her business operations, which she has expanded to Denver and soon, she hopes, to California. “I’m going into totally unknown territory,” says Daguin of her company’s recent growth. “It’s new, but it’s very exciting.” --Maria Aspan

No.46

Lisa Q. Fetterman

After copycats moved in on her sous-vide machines, she began selling fancy frozen meals to cook in them.

Lisa Q. Fetterman.
Location
San Francisco, California
Year Founded
2012
Twitter
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

From the first, Nomiku—Lisa Fetterman’s home sous-vide maker business—earned love from Kickstarter, Shark Tank, and food nerds. Then came the imitators. “We got copied up the yang,” says Fetterman. “If you Google ‘sous-vide,’ there are now like one bajillion machines.” Seeking inspiration, Fetterman embarked on field research, observing 25 of her customers using Nomiku machines in their homes and then—as a thank you—sous-viding meals for them. “Everyone was like, ‘Couldn’t this be your product--that you come chef for us?’” she says. So last year Fetterman started selling 30 frozen sous-vide meals, with recipes devised by herself and chefs from three Michelin-starred restaurants. Her machines now come with RFID readers that can recognize each meal, ensuring that it’s perfectly cooked. The renamed Nomiku Meals sells machines at cost and makes all its money on repeat purchases of the food. So far the strategy is working. Revenue doubled in 2018 and Fetterman anticipates a repeat performance this year. --Leigh Buchanan

No.47

Kellee James

Farmers, bankers, and food companies rely on her agricultural data and analysis.

Kellee James.
Location
Silver Spring, Maryland
Year Founded
2012
Twitter
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

How do you assign a financial value to sustainable agriculture? For Kellee James, who co-founded the market intelligence startup Mercaris in 2013, answering that question has become a true calling. “It’s one thing if you’re paying $9 for a bushel of corn and you want to incentivize organic production practices,” explains the former White House Fellow, who was selected by President Obama. “It’s another if you’re a farmer or food company losing money because you don’t know what’s going on in the market.” Like a Bloomberg Terminal for organic and non-GMO agriculture, Mercaris provides data and analysis on economic fundamentals like market prices, supply estimates, and projected demand. These are helpful to everyone along the supply chain, including farmers and consumer food companies like General Mills, as well as financial institutions like Rabobank. Up next: risk-management tools and some fine-tuning of its organic dairy platform, which launched earlier this year. --Jill Krasny