Company Profile

No.15

Neon Roots

The tiny app studio churning out booming startups

Industry
Consumer Products & Services
Location
Los Angeles, California
Year Founded
2011
Company Size
11-50 employees
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

When a celebrity, public figure, or company wants an app built, they often turn to an agency. Ben Lee and Drew Harding had worked at one such agency, and knew all its flaws. They wanted to upend the agency model that included billing clients for time, which led to the frequent creation of feature-heavy, clunky apps. In 2011, they founded a tech studio called Neon Roots. While the startup builds apps and does development consulting for companies and celebrities, it more closely resembles a private business incubator. That's because before committing to a project, they bring a client through a two-week workshop process called Rootstrap, which they developed to analyze the market fit and viability of the proposed project, and to hone it before any costly programming begins. Neon Roots has worked with more than 100 clients, including companies such as Spotify and Epson, and celebrities such as Tony Robbins and Snoop Dogg.
Note: All data as of 1/31/16

No.16

Neurensic

Meet Wall Street's new A.I. sheriffs

Industry
Business Products & Services
Location
Chicago, Illinois
Year Founded
2015
Company Size
11-50 employees
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

Neurensic's core product uses artificial intelligence to understand and form its own judgments about the massive amounts of data spit out by the futures trading desks of financial companies. It also looks for compliance anomalies such as Michael Coscia's spoofing activity, as well as other market-skewing tactics that may be perpetrated by rogue traders. "Our artificial intelligence is completely self-adaptive and can learn by itself," says co-founder David Widerhorn. If that sounds a tad futuristic, it is. Neursensic is somewhat in the vanguard, in a nascent market for compliance intelligence that is currently worth about $450 million, according to research firm Aite Group, which forecasts the market will grow to $1 billion in the next 10 years. Today, Neurensic has 45 employees and had revenue of 250,000 for 2015. That's not bad for a company that launched officially in the same year, following a year-long pilot. In addition to Widerhorn, co-founders include Zach Watts, the chief innovation officer, Tim Geannopulos, chief operating officer, and Paul Giedraitis and Jay Vohra, both principals.
Note: All data as of 1/31/16

 

No.17

Neutun Labs

Neutun's seizure tracker helps keep epilepsy sufferers safe

Industry
Health
Location
Woodbridge, Pennsylvania
Year Founded
2014
Company Size
1-10 employees
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

Eric Dolan, co-founder of software company Neutun Labs, is clear about the importance of the disease that led him to become an entrepreneur. "Epilepsy is a highly stigmatizing and traumatizing condition," he says. No surprise, then, that he doesn't want to elaborate when he says epilepsy is "in his family." There's no doubt, though, that an intimacy with the condition is the motivating force behind Neutun, which Dolan, a software developer, and his brother Alex, who had just finished a degree in health care informatics, co-founded in 2014. The software company uses digital wearables that are already on the market--such as a Pebble or Apple watch--to track epileptic seizures. When the person wearing the watch starts to move in a way that indicates one coming on, Neutun automatically sends an email or text alert to a family member or caregiver. Neutun is not the first to attempt this. But its approach--using available hardware to create a discrete monitoring system--is relatively new. The company aims to be the standard tracking and notification technology for a variety of seizures, whether they're caused by epilepsy, Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, or another condition.
Note: All data as of 1/31/16

No.18

NuLabel

These guys got $22 million to get rid of sticky labels

Industry
Business Products & Services
Location
East Providence, Rhode Island
Year Founded
2009
Company Size
11-50 employees
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

Max Winograd and two of his Brown University classmates, Ben Lux and Mike Woods, came up with the idea to start NuLabel while working on a capstone project for an entrepreneurship class. They were paired with an adjunct professor who had come from a label-printing company. "He told us that almost every major customer of theirs would throw half of every label away," recalls Winograd. "For every million shipping labels, you're throwing away 2,300 pounds of backing paper." It seemed like a problem worth solving. Seven years later, NuLabel has technology that helps food and beverage brands reduce packaging costs, waste, and downtime. They've done it by inventing a fluid-activated adhesive that's applied to label papers, but that remains completely dry to the touch until it's activated by a water-based, glue-free spray. The result was no sticky label backing to gum up machinery, and the complete elimination of backing paper. The environmental impact is potentially huge: Just think about all of those FedEx, UPS, and Amazon packages that require labeling.
Note: All data as of 1/31/16

No.19

On Second Thought

The app that started with a bad text to an ex

Industry
Consumer Products & Services
Location
San Francisco, California
Year Founded
2014
Company Size
1-10 employees
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

Ever wish you could take that text back? On Second Thought lets you do just that. The brainchild of founder and CEO Maci Peterson, the app lets you set a delay of up to a minute on each text, allowing you to swipe the text back and interrupt sending it in case you have second thoughts about what you've just said. Peterson came up with the idea after accidentally sending her ex boyfriend an inappropriate message. "Hey, sorry, I keep missing your calls," she had meant to type. Instead she wrote -- well, let's just say the word "calls" didn't come out how she had intended. Founded in 2014, the company is in early days, with just four employees and seed-round fundraising still going on. The app counts 67,000 users in 200 countries, a number Peterson expects to see grow dramatically when On Second Thought is finally preloaded onto phones through a popular carrier in Latin America. A goal of the company: Enable mobile payments. Until then, On Second Thought is giving you a chance to watch what you say in a medium that a lot of people find a little too immediate.
Note: All data as of 1/31/16