Company Profile

No.28

Sarah LaFleur

Women spend over $70 million a year on her chic, personalized workwear.

Location
New York, New York
Year Founded
2013
Twitter
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

Women’s workwear brand M.M.LaFleur first gained a following by curating “Bento Boxes” of coordinating looks—think tailored suits and sharp dresses—that busy women could try on at home. The strategy helped M.M.LaFleur hit more than $70 million in revenue in 2017—but it won’t keep the brand growing. More women are dressing casually for work, and an increasing number still want the in-store experience. LaFleur has responded to these trends by leaning hard into seven brick-and-mortar retail showrooms, where same-store revenue is up 13 percent from 2018. The company is also designing more lines for the formal and casual ends of their 25-55-year-old customer base—launching a high-end suiting collection this fall and designing a machine-washable, wrinkle-resistant travel line. “Releasing these two collections allows us to target both the C-suite exec and the younger, more casual woman on the go,” says co-founder and CEO Sarah LaFleur. --Lindsay Blakely

No.29

Catherine Mahugu

She put the work of African artisans on the covers of American magazines.

Catherine Mahugu.
Location
San Francisco, California
Year Founded
2012
Twitter
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

Look away from Michelle Obama’s dazzling smile on the cover of December’s Essence magazine and you might notice a graceful brass ring and necklace—both from Soko. That photo “was such a validation of what we do,” says Catherine Mahugu, who co-founded the business with Gwendolyn Floyd and Ella Peinovich. After Obama’s cover, Oprah Winfrey flashed a Soko bracelet and earrings on the cover of April’s O magazine— and fashion pace-setters like Reformation, Zolando, Amour Vert, and Nordstrom’s have taken up the brand. But what’s more important to Soko’s co-founders is the income provided for the 2,300 artisans in Mahugu’s native Kenya. To advantage African workers, Mahugu also just launched Chiswara, a company trying to digitize the agricultural supply chain, first by partnering with small farmers in Kenya to sell their coffee internationally. “In the U.S., we pay $5 for a cup of coffee, but the lives of the farmers don’t reflect that,” says Mahugu, whose parents grew up on coffee farms. “We are giving farmers a seat at the table.” --Leigh Buchanan

No.30

Tamara Mellon

This Jimmy Choo co-founder is taking luxury shoe sales direct to consumer.

Location
West Hollywood, California
Year Founded
2010
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

Tamara Mellon is the past of footwear retail and its future. After co-founding Jimmy Choo, Mellon launched a namesake shoe line that went bankrupt. She parlayed the lessons of that bankruptcy into a leaner, direct-to-consumer brand that she’s determined will be the luxury shoe of choice. By doing its prototyping stateside while keeping production in Italy, Mellon’s namesake company has cut the typical development time on a new style from three months to one. That’s increasingly necessary as Mellon ditches the industry’s standard seasonal collections in favor of frequent, small releases. Drawing from a $91 million VC war chest, which includes backing from private equity firm NEA, Tamara Mellon opened its first store in November. It’s currently doing an impressive $3,000 per square foot--and doubling year-over-year sales. --Kimberly Weisul

No.31

Rebecca Minkoff

She uses her platform as the founder of a $100 million fashion brand to support women-owned businesses

Rebecca Minkoff.
3-Year Growth
205%
Industry
Retail
Location
New York, New York
Year Founded
2005
Company Size
51-200 employees
Inc. 5000 Rankings
No. 1927 (2015), No. 1371 (2014), No. 922 (2013), No. 706 (2012), No. 579 (2011)
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

Two decades into building her $100 million namesake brand, New York City clothing and handbag designer Rebecca Minkoff is still on the rise--with space in 900 stores worldwide and business growing by double digits--and she's taking other female entrepreneurs with her. The Female Founder Collective, which Minkoff launched last year, is a network of women-run businesses boasting a seal that its 50,000-plus Instagram followers can recognize, support, and promote. The group harnesses the talents of its members--from Draper James founder Reese Witherspoon to scrappy Nashville-based meal-delivery company Dinner Belle--"to enable and empower female-owned and led businesses to positively impact our communities, both socially and economically." --Christine Lagorio-Chafkin

No.32

Rihanna

She is the first woman to create a fashion house with luxury behemoth LVMH.

Rihanna.
Year Founded
2014
Data as of Publication on Aug. 11, 2020
Company Description

At just 31 years old, nine-time Grammy-winner Robyn Rihanna Fenty is a one-woman empire, with deals in music, film, fashion, and cosmetics minting a reported $600 million every year. In May, her portfolio got even bigger: The native Barbadian became the first woman to create an original fashion label with French luxury behemoth LVMH—and the first woman of color to run one. Fenty is a patented line of clothes, shoes, and accessories designed to complement the entertainer’s already successful makeup line, Fenty Beauty, which reportedly pulled in $570 million last year. The artist is designing her new clothing line--the first new fashion house created by LVHM in over 30 years--to operate solely via e-commerce, without runway shows or flagship boutiques. It will also offer up to size 14 U.S., a more inclusive range than is typically shown on Fashion Week runways. It’s a fitting gesture for an artist who’s building her fashion label in her own image--to “thrive beyond traditional boundaries.” --Zoë Henry