Founder Profile

Tiffany Masterson

Drunk Elephant

She just wanted her product to be effective. Now she has Sephora's fastest-growing skin care brand.

Tiffany Masterson never set out to create a cult skin care brand. She just wanted to make “something as effective as what you can find in the dermatologist’s office,” she says. After spending two years researching the ingredients commonly found in skin care products, the Houstonian singled out six that could potentially trigger issues in people’s skin. In 2012, she enlisted a chemist who used her research to whip up Drunk Elephant, a line of clinically effective products that became popular in a hurry. By 2016, Drunk Elephant was on the favorites wall of Sephora; between 2016 and 2018, Drunk Elephant quadrupled revenue to “well over” $100 million. As Masterson mulls selling the company for $1 billion, she is expanding to Hong Kong, and she also has her eyes set on the U.K. and Australia as well as the launch of “lifestyle” products. “The reason we do well is because we are who we are,” says the founder. “It’s not this bravado type of attitude with us.” --Jill Krasny

Industry
Consumer Products
Year Founded
2013
Location
Houston, Texas
Industry
All Things Consumer
Data as of Publication on Sep 16, 2019
Inc. Honors
Inc. Female Founders
2019

Tiffany Masterson never set out to create a cult skin care brand. She just wanted to make “something as effective as what you can find in the dermatologist’s office,” she says. After spending two years researching the ingredients commonly found in skin care products, the Houstonian singled out six that could potentially trigger issues in people’s skin. In 2012, she enlisted a chemist who used her research to whip up Drunk Elephant, a line of clinically effective products that became popular in a hurry. By 2016, Drunk Elephant was on the favorites wall of Sephora; between 2016 and 2018, Drunk Elephant quadrupled revenue to “well over” $100 million. As Masterson mulls selling the company for $1 billion, she is expanding to Hong Kong, and she also has her eyes set on the U.K. and Australia as well as the launch of “lifestyle” products. “The reason we do well is because we are who we are,” says the founder. “It’s not this bravado type of attitude with us.” --Jill Krasny

Read More

Tamara Mellon

Tamara Mellon

This Jimmy Choo co-founder is taking luxury shoe sales direct to consumer.

Tamara Mellon is the past of footwear retail and its future. After co-founding Jimmy Choo, Mellon launched a namesake shoe line that went bankrupt. She parlayed the lessons of that bankruptcy into a leaner, direct-to-consumer brand that she’s determined will be the luxury shoe of choice. By doing its prototyping stateside while keeping production in Italy, Mellon’s namesake company has cut the typical development time on a new style from three months to one. That’s increasingly necessary as Mellon ditches the industry’s standard seasonal collections in favor of frequent, small releases. Drawing from a $91 million VC war chest, which includes backing from private equity firm NEA, Tamara Mellon opened its first store in November. It’s currently doing an impressive $3,000 per square foot--and doubling year-over-year sales. --Kimberly Weisul

Industry
Retail
Year Founded
2010
Location
West Hollywood, California
Industry
Fashion Forward
Co-founder
Jill Layfield
Data as of Publication on Sep 16, 2019
Inc. Honors
Inc. Female Founders
2019

Tamara Mellon is the past of footwear retail and its future. After co-founding Jimmy Choo, Mellon launched a namesake shoe line that went bankrupt. She parlayed the lessons of that bankruptcy into a leaner, direct-to-consumer brand that she’s determined will be the luxury shoe of choice. By doing its prototyping stateside while keeping production in Italy, Mellon’s namesake company has cut the typical development time on a new style from three months to one. That’s increasingly necessary as Mellon ditches the industry’s standard seasonal collections in favor of frequent, small releases. Drawing from a $91 million VC war chest, which includes backing from private equity firm NEA, Tamara Mellon opened its first store in November. It’s currently doing an impressive $3,000 per square foot--and doubling year-over-year sales. --Kimberly Weisul

Read More

Rebecca Minkoff

Rebecca Minkoff

She uses her platform as the founder of a $100 million fashion brand to support women-owned businesses

Rebecca Minkoff. Gabriela Celeste

Two decades into building her $100 million namesake brand, New York City clothing and handbag designer Rebecca Minkoff is still on the rise--with space in 900 stores worldwide and business growing by double digits--and she's taking other female entrepreneurs with her. The Female Founder Collective, which Minkoff launched last year, is a network of women-run businesses boasting a seal that its 50,000-plus Instagram followers can recognize, support, and promote. The group harnesses the talents of its members--from Draper James founder Reese Witherspoon to scrappy Nashville-based meal-delivery company Dinner Belle--"to enable and empower female-owned and led businesses to positively impact our communities, both socially and economically." --Christine Lagorio-Chafkin

Industry
Retail
Year Founded
2005
Location
New York, New York
Industry
Fashion Forward
Co-founder
Uri Minkoff
Company Size
51-200 employees
Data as of Publication on Sep 16, 2019
Inc. Honors
Inc. Female Founders
2019

Two decades into building her $100 million namesake brand, New York City clothing and handbag designer Rebecca Minkoff is still on the rise--with space in 900 stores worldwide and business growing by double digits--and she's taking other female entrepreneurs with her. The Female Founder Collective, which Minkoff launched last year, is a network of women-run businesses boasting a seal that its 50,000-plus Instagram followers can recognize, support, and promote. The group harnesses the talents of its members--from Draper James founder Reese Witherspoon to scrappy Nashville-based meal-delivery company Dinner Belle--"to enable and empower female-owned and led businesses to positively impact our communities, both socially and economically." --Christine Lagorio-Chafkin

Read More
Inc. 5000
No. 1927 (2015), No. 1371 (2014), No. 922 (2013), No. 706 (2012)

Judi Sheppard Missett

Jazzercise

She was a pioneer in understanding just how big fitness would become—and has stayed on top of her company for 50 years.

Judi Sheppard Missett. Courtesy subject

Not many entrepreneurs have to rent out convention centers to celebrate their companies’ silver anniversaries. But that’s what Judi Sheppard Missett did in June, when more than 3,000 teachers and students of Jazzercise descended on San Diego for two days of classes (some taught by the 75-year old Missett), branded apparel, and general hoopla. An on-site museum chronicled Missett’s odyssey from a 13-year-old hoofer instructing kids in her parents’ basement in Iowa through her founding of an international brand that was, in the ’80s, the nation’s second largest franchiser and a pioneer in the fitness industry. Today, Missett remains CEO of the $100 million company, with more than 8,500 franchises worldwide. (Her daughter, Shanna Missett Nelson, is president.) “There aren’t a lot of women who started a company and are still running it 50 years later—and that company is thriving,” says Missett. --Leigh Buchanan

Industry
Consumer Services
Year Founded
1969
Location
Carlsbad, California
Industry
Fitness Nation
Data as of Publication on Sep 16, 2019
Inc. Honors
Inc. Female Founders
2019

Not many entrepreneurs have to rent out convention centers to celebrate their companies’ silver anniversaries. But that’s what Judi Sheppard Missett did in June, when more than 3,000 teachers and students of Jazzercise descended on San Diego for two days of classes (some taught by the 75-year old Missett), branded apparel, and general hoopla. An on-site museum chronicled Missett’s odyssey from a 13-year-old hoofer instructing kids in her parents’ basement in Iowa through her founding of an international brand that was, in the ’80s, the nation’s second largest franchiser and a pioneer in the fitness industry. Today, Missett remains CEO of the $100 million company, with more than 8,500 franchises worldwide. (Her daughter, Shanna Missett Nelson, is president.) “There aren’t a lot of women who started a company and are still running it 50 years later—and that company is thriving,” says Missett. --Leigh Buchanan

Read More

Christine Moseley

Full Harvest

She created an online marketplace for unwanted but edible produce.

Christine Moseley. Courtesy subject

Watermelon, celery hearts, broccoli bits: There’s no shortage of food that goes to waste in America. In 2010, the Food and Drug Administration said the volume of such food in the U.S. totaled no less than 133 billion pounds. Christine Moseley saw this waste firsthand while visiting a romaine farm in Salinas, California, where only a fraction of the crop was harvested. That moment, which she calls heartbreaking, inspired the 2015 launch of Full Harvest, an online marketplace that connects growers’ imperfect produce with food and beverage buyers. “We helped growers increase their yield and profit by acre,” says Moseley, who spent 15 years in logistics and food retailing. Today, she and a global food brand are developing a plant-based snack made entirely of rescued produce, and she is proud to say that she’s doing her part in the fight against climate change. --Jill Krasny

Industry
Food & Beverage
Year Founded
2015
Location
San Francisco, California
Industry
Food Revolutionaries
Data as of Publication on Sep 16, 2019
Inc. Honors
Inc. Female Founders
2019

Watermelon, celery hearts, broccoli bits: There’s no shortage of food that goes to waste in America. In 2010, the Food and Drug Administration said the volume of such food in the U.S. totaled no less than 133 billion pounds. Christine Moseley saw this waste firsthand while visiting a romaine farm in Salinas, California, where only a fraction of the crop was harvested. That moment, which she calls heartbreaking, inspired the 2015 launch of Full Harvest, an online marketplace that connects growers’ imperfect produce with food and beverage buyers. “We helped growers increase their yield and profit by acre,” says Moseley, who spent 15 years in logistics and food retailing. Today, she and a global food brand are developing a plant-based snack made entirely of rescued produce, and she is proud to say that she’s doing her part in the fight against climate change. --Jill Krasny

Read More