What's the best way to structure a meeting in order to get the maximum strategic feedback? originally appeared on Quora - the place to gain and share knowledge, empowering people to learn from others and better understand the world.

Answer by Jeff Glueck, CEO of Foursquare, on Quora:

For me, the key for any meeting is to have a specific objective in mind and make sure you stay on topic. In the case of our board meetings where the objective is to get feedback, we changed the meeting structure from being an "update" meeting to an "asking for advice meeting." If you're looking for the same, here are three steps to follow:

  1. Send the deck beforehand. Make sure your meeting attendees read your deck before they get to the meeting so they are familiar with all the issues and they are up to date.
  2. Do not review the slides. In the meeting, use the deck as a reference point and as a conversation starter but do not read through the slides. Since your meeting attendees have already read your deck, this would be redundant and a waste of time.
  3. Ask questions. The best way to get feedback is to ask for it. One of the first slides in our board deck is a list of questions and topics we would like to get the board's feedback on. Such as: Here is my problem, how should I address it? When you have a bunch of smart, experienced people in the room, the conversation is typically robust. It also helps keep your investors or Board members from going rogue or wasting time on tangents if you give them a specific topic where you need advice. (They are less likely to cause distractions if you keep them busy where you really need help, I believe, having been a CEO a couple times now.)Here's another smart take on the topic, published in WSJ: A Manifesto to End Boring Meetings

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