Can you believe there was a time during the 21st century when we actually accepted the scarcity of cabs on a Saturday night? Before on-demand car services, that's what we did, believe it or not. Blasphemous, isn't it?!

Apps are now expected to heal customer pain points almost instantly, solving our problems and showing us an easier, annoyance-free way of life. This new generation of apps is fueling a real-time problem-solving economy where users are willing to pay a premium for that kind of convenience. Moving and storing our stuff is a pain, being on a bad date is a (huge) pain, and finding a parking a spot can be a pain even for the tiniest of cars. Plus, all of those scenarios are a waste of our precious time.

So what are we waiting for? Let's look at three apps that solve those pesky problems and give us the instant gratification we so covet.

On-demand storage (and delivery) of your stuff

When your central-city apartment is filled to its gills, storing your stuff off-site is no longer as complicated as borrowing your buddy's truck, dealing with metered parking, and hauling it all to the least sleazy storage facility you can find. Instead, look to Omni, a company that's basically revolutionizing "stuff storage" and item cataloging.

All you have to do is download the app, schedule a time for an Omni concierge to pick up what you'd like to have stored, and then they'll take your things to a state-of-the-art storage facility where the items will be photographed and cataloged. Need something back? View your digital catalog on your phone, and get the item delivered to your doorstep with a tap.

Users aren't just sending away their camping gear and oversized furniture, though. Many users look to the app to store treasured collections, from sneakers to formal dresses they've only worn once, enjoying those collections digitally and showing them off to friends on their phones until they want in-person access again. (Cher from Clueless didn't even have it this good.)

Nip a bad date in the bud

While most dating apps are purely focused on matchmaking, the bod (bad online dates) app is a geo-location-based mobile app that helps bad-date sufferers find nearby singles, giving them a second chance at finding "the one" that day or night. Jennifer Kelton, founder and CEO of bod, says, "People are looking for fast, relevant, real-time solutions that have the same speed as looking up questions on Google or asking Siri.

The bod app fuels real-time problem-solving by giving daters a plan B." Furthering its problem-solving component, the app offers conversation icebreakers and other "encouragement features" to help shy users get started on their new dates. Users can enable their discoverability by being in "Date Mode" and quickly move on from a bad date to a potentially good one. Consider it the "mop-up crew" of all other dating sites and apps.

Park my car for me, please

Despise searching for parking spots? Live in a city where parking is practically impossible? Request a valet through Luxe and they'll park your car in a secure lot so you can be on your merry way quickly. All you have to do is tap a button to request a valet wherever you are, and even if you make your way to the other side of town by the end of your evening, Luxe will return your car to you there.

Dirty car? Have them wash it while you're out. Need fuel? They can do that too. Rates vary by city but you pay roughly $5 an hour, which is comparable to what you'd pay parking on the street. There's also a monthly subscription service available for those who need to valet frequently (potentially creating a whole new way of life for the whopping 86% of the U.S. workforce that commutes to work).

BONUS: If you're on the marketing side of the app table, then check out Appboy. Just as important as solving customer pains, is understanding what they need to stay engaged.

Bottom line

Today's real-time problem solving apps let you outsource what you don't want to waste your time doing. And in this era of "insta-grat" we've all signed a silent contract saying we're willing to trade money for convenience.

Published on: May 12, 2016