"Success is not final; failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts." Winston Churchill

Courage requires the incredible power of believing in yourself. Or does belief in yourself require courage? A man on the battlefield looks inwardly to survive first and foremost. Despite the support of his team around him, fearlessness motivates him to act on behalf of the task at hand. Taking risks. He relies on his own ingenuity to live another day. No one else.

1.Exploit your abilities

Knowing your strengths and weaknesses are essential to success. Exploiting strengths while ignoring weaknesses, however, stifles confidence. It is not the fear, but the uncertainty of one's abilities that make someone uncomfortable. Becoming adept at a skill maximizes efficacy and minimizes equating judgment by others as a means of achievement.

2.Charge ahead

During the Black Hawk War of 1832, Abraham Lincoln enlisted as a captain and returned as a private, but it did not stop his determination or cause him to shrink back from serving. Additionally, Lincoln did not allow numerous defeats in running for public office to deter him from continuing. He believed his contribution mattered no matter which capacity he delivered it. He stuck to his convictions and proved failure is only a bridge to accomplishment.

3. Trust Thyself

In a world where trust wains, trusting your instincts is what merits the most worthy consideration. Invest in what you know and others will, too. Trust in your competence, even if you're inexperienced, will elicit a positive response. A first-time father has no experience, but negotiates his way through parenthood by trial and error. Innovation is untested, yet imperative to progress.

Believing in yourself is the first step to success whether it means your life, your career, or simply your confidence, and in that lies your power.

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Published on: Dec 15, 2015
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