"I don't like that man. I must get to know him better." - Abraham Lincoln

The wise words of the 16th president of the United States ring loud in a world with so much division, distraction, and disagreement.

Today, the faster something validates our assumption or worldview, the quicker we seem to adopt that information. The human brain craves the shortest route to make sense of information. However, that shortcut can leave out a lot of understanding and perspective-shaping context.

Today's multi-generational, vastly-diverse, high-flux, technology-accelerating, info-inundated, headline-reading culture demands that we seek more understanding.

There is a wealth of information today but a poverty of understanding.

In my line of work as a generational speaker, author, and trainer, I consistently see people (and organizations) holding too tight to their misguided assumptions of other generations.

I got into teaching about generations because of these misguided assumptions and the generational finger pointing that caused organizations to stall and leaders to stagnant.

Leaders were saying, "I don't like that generation." And I wanted to move them to say, "I must get to know that generation better."

Getting to know someone's personal story about the events, struggles, and triumphs that shaped who they are allows for a deeper connection, appreciation, and understanding between two people.

Similarly, elevating the conversation beyond generations and taking a broader look at the events, technology, and innovations that are shaping generations enables leaders to better communicate, lead, and work across generations.

Lincoln's quote is a strong reminder that we must resist jumping to conclusions and first seek understanding.

If you don't like that...generation, employee, colleague, or manager. Get to know them better.

If you don't like that...technology, policy, rule, or view. Get to know it better.

True knowledge is understanding the extent of your own ignorance.

Published on: Feb 26, 2019
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