Odds are, you'll never hear someone complain that they're getting too much recognition.

Good news is there's a wealth of opportunity to reward and recognize every day just in the way we interact with others--when we show them respect and signs that they're valued.

I call this giving "respectcognition."

And I'm not exaggerating when I call it a wealth of opportunity. University of Michigan's Jane Dutton indicates that an incredible 90 percent of workers say workplace civility is a serious issue.

Who would have thought that mindfully showing respect to co-workers could be an energizing form of reward and recognition?

And yet that's where we are in today's workplace.

Here are 11 ways to give respectcognition:

1. Inquiring and listening, really listening

You're recognizing a person's worth when you really listen to them. Practice the WAIT principle if it helps (ask yourself "Why Am I Talking"?)

2. Staying available and approachable

You're recognizing that the opportunity to connect with you as a leader is valued and even seen as a reward. And it's OK to be professional and personable.

3. Recognizing people's state of mind

Imagine an invisible sign around someone's neck that speaks to their state of mind. What does it say? Being sensitive to what might be going on in others' lives is recognition that you care.

4. Recognizing different styles of communication

Shift gears. Adjust, accommodate, appreciate. Reward people for being who they are.

5. Recognizing the value of others' opinions and ideas

Seek out opinions from others, even those not ordinarily in the loop. It says "You matter."

6. Constructive feedback done right

You're recognizing others desire to grow. You're rewarding them with the investment of your time.

7. Recognizing the value of others time

Be on time yourself. Role model its importance.

8. Recognizing the effort people put into big meetings

They rehearse and stress the night before. They might buy new outfits. Reward them by putting them at ease. Afterward, recognize their effort.

9. Recognizing social comfort zones

Use humor, but never at another's expense. Reward by being fun around others, not making hurtful fun of others.

10. Recognizing the past

Show respect for who worked on what, especially if you're changing a decision or direction or commenting on days gone by.

11. Recognizing others' existence

Say hello to everyone you pass in the halls. No one has actually invented invisibility yet. The more names you learn and use, the better.

Published on: Oct 31, 2016