How would your customers behave if suddenly you weren't around, or you weren't in the spaces they are used to seeing you?

Beyonce did not attend the 2018 Met Gala. The megastar is normally a staple at the event. However, it is rumored she skipped the affair last year to get some rest in advance of the world tour she and her husband embarked on soon after.

Although Beyonce wasn't in attendance, her fans gave a fun commentary on social media as if she did attend as The Holy Ghost, in keeping with the Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination theme of the event.

Nineteen-time best-selling author Seth Godin often talks about this concept. In his talks, on his blog, podcast, and books, he often poses some form of the question "would [your customers] miss you if you were gone?"

For Beyonce fans and followers, the answer was yes. They missed her presence so much at the event, they re-imagined what it would be like if she were there.

Last year I took a few months off from emailing the people on my list. During my hiatus, I got emails from people asking where I was, and when I started sending messages and content again, I received more notes letting me know I was missed.

Your goal as a business is to become so inextricably linked in the lives of your customers that they don't want to imagine life without you.

Here are two ways to become so entrenched in your customers' world, that they would miss you if you were gone, or weren't where they expected you to be.

1. Consistently deliver remarkable experiences.

Beyonce wasn't scheduled to perform at the Met Gala last year. And there were plenty of other celebrities and fashion icons present at the event. But for members of the BeyHive, it wasn't enough. They wanted to see their Queen B and her take on the theme.

Do you stand out enough from others in your market, that your customers crave your point of view? In a crowd of you and your competitors, are the experiences that you deliver the ones your customers most look forward to?

To be clear, this didn't happen instantly with Beyonce. She's had a long twenty-year career of showing up and delighting her audience on a consistent basis with her music, performances, videos, and fashion.

Every time she does show up, she's delivering a remarkable experience. It doesn't matter if she is performing a concert, posting photos of herself on Instagram, or attending a basketball game.

Carefully design every aspect of your customer experience so your customers grow accustomed and excited about the level of excellence you deliver.

2. Extend the experiences you deliver beyond just your core offering.

The other day I was perusing through Instagram and came across a post by singer Kelly Rowland. Her fans had been wishing her a happy birthday, and in one of her posts she was expressing gratitude for all their birthday love.

Don't limit the places where you show up in your customers' lives to only be in the products, services, and experiences you deliver.

Extend your reach and how you become an integral part of your customers' world by meeting them where they are. Give them more of what they crave from you.

Rowland does that by showing up on Instagram, both with posts and stories that give glimpses into her life. Beyonce, Rowland's former bandmate posts photos and videos on Instagram.

For these entertainers, most of this content has nothing to do with their core craft of music and performing. But they serve the purpose of keeping their audience interested, giving them experiences they can be excited about.

Do this enough over time, and your audience will start to miss you when you're gone. They will take notice.

Something as simple as showing up on social media on a consistent basis can make a big impact. I get used to seeing the stories and posts of some people that I follow, and when I don't see them for a few days, I notice that I do miss them.

You can create that same degree of intimacy and engagement with your own customers.

Published on: Feb 20, 2019
The opinions expressed here by Inc.com columnists are their own, not those of Inc.com.