I experiment with a lot of productivity tips and tricks. I'm borderline obsessed with finding ways to get more out of the day, but it was an accidental change that had the biggest impact over the past three months.

Our morning commutes can have a notable impact on our day. A stressful start and it can put you in a bad mood before you set foot in the office. And it was a day like that when I accidentally stumbled upon a small change that would improve my days.

Following a road closure, my drive into work was a slow one. I was on the outskirts of the city centre when I finally gave up and pulled into the nearest car park, giving myself a twenty minute walk to the office. Despite the fact I'd had an awful start to the day, by the time I arrived, I felt wide awake and raring to go. I got through everything I needed to complete that day in about four hours, as opposed to the seven I'd expected it would take.

That was two months ago and I've stuck with it ever since. Each morning, I now park a twenty minute walk from my office, giving me a brisk walk both at the beginning and end of the day. Turns out, it isn't just a coincidence that I'm getting more done. There's research to back it up.

The Incredible Benefits of a 20 Minute Walk

A simple 20 minute walk each day has scientifically backed benefits:

  • It puts you in a better mood. Just a short walk will release endorphins that make you feel more positive and generally better.
  • Science also backs up the fact that walking for just 20 minutes will leave you more energetic
  • Regular exercise, even brisk walking like this, improves your memory and keeps you sharper

And how does this impact your productivity?

Well, there's plenty of evidence that correlates better moods with increased productivity and a sharper memory can improve the quality of your output.

Simple Changes

It's a simple change to make. Park further away from your office, walk the remainder of the way and put your productivity to the test.

Published on: Oct 26, 2016
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