It's remarkable when you think about it: Steve Jobs, one of the most original of all entrepreneurs, one of the most creative, one of the most liberated and liberating, had a dress code!

He wore it religiously. The very same clothes, every single day, for the majority of his astonishingly creative life.

So, why is that so important? Because, I would suggest, most of those on the uber side of the collective would trash the idea of a dress code. Would think "McDonald's," and scoff at it. Would think, "We're better than that," and deride the very idea of it. A dress code? Are you kidding me?

I had the wonderful opportunity to meet with an enormously successful entrepreneur at his home in Malibu for a brief conversation about Judaism and Chabad (a subject we'll talk about in a later column). The conversation got into how to organize an enterprise, whether that be a religious enterprise or a secular enterprise, to be assured that it will work.

One thing he said was surprising. "It's clear and simple," he said. "Every day I get up to a closet hung with the very same shirt, and the very same slacks, and the very same shoes. Elegant, yes, but the very same. I do that so that I don't have to think about that. And I choose not to think about that because I choose to think about much more important things. Like our brand. Like our operating system. Like our positioning in the world."

"In other words," he said, "my enterprise, whatever enterprise I'm pursuing at the time, is everything to me. Just as Apple was to Steve Jobs. And, just like Steve Jobs, that's all I think about."

Delightful, don't you think?

What we think about, what we become consumed with, determines what we create in our lives.

Steve Jobs thought about Apple.

What do you think about?

 

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Published on: Nov 23, 2015
The opinions expressed here by Inc.com columnists are their own, not those of Inc.com.