Many people have excuses for keeping poor performers or disengaged employees on their team. But when you hang on to them, you risk negatively impacting productivity and morale across not only the team, but the company, too.

Here are some common characteristics among those who just show up for a paycheck:

  1. They worry more about their personal brand than they do about delivering for the company. The athlete who cares more about his personal statistics than he does about his team winning is not the player who ultimately achieves the most success.
  2. They don't get excited about what the company does. If someone is an eye roller and not into celebrating or cheering, it's probably less about it not being their "style" and more about them not caring about the company.
  3. They don't understand why other people work so hard. This is a big problem. It really isn't a matter of not understanding; it's a form of jealousy. People who work hard are passionate about what they do, pure and simple.
  4. They use the phrase "I work to live; I don't live to work." Work and someone's career should be a huge part of their life. The thrill of accomplishment when someone gets that promotion they've been working toward is as much of a high as traveling the world--plus, it pays for it!  
  5. They hang out with other complainers in the office. Misery loves company, and when you get a group that forms around complaints, it can be toxic. Work on getting those employees to associate with the positive people whose careers are moving forward at 100 mph. If they hang out with the achievers, they will learn and grow as a result, and ultimately be more fulfilled in their roles.

The best employees are those who do what they're told, execute, volunteer for tasks, hit deadlines, prepare, own up to their mistakes, bring solutions, and have great attitudes. Don't settle for less.

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Published on: Feb 7, 2019
The opinions expressed here by Inc.com columnists are their own, not those of Inc.com.