Dale Carnegie's business philosophies have always had a seat at our family's dinner table and my two sisters and I were required to read the famous book How to Win Friends and Influence People (thanks, dad). Selling over 30 million copies, it has certainly withstood the test of time. As I have started and more recently shut down a startup, these quotes are more meaningful to me today than ever before.

1. "When dealing with people, remember you are not dealing with creatures of logic, but creatures of emotion."

Whether selling products or negotiating terms, you must break down emotional barriers to achieving your goal. Appeal to their human side and harness your emotional intelligence.

2. "Most of the important things in the world have been accomplished by people who have kept on trying when there seemed to be no hope at all."

Resiliency is the lifeblood of successful entrepreneurs. When hope seems lost is when entrepreneurs truly rise.

3. "Actions speak louder than words, and a smile says, 'I like you. You make me happy. I am glad to see you."

Entering a room with a smile is critical in building rapport and it encourages people to interact with you.

4. "The successful [person] will profit from his mistakes and try again in a different way."

Most entrepreneurs have had to fall flat on their faces before the right opportunity presented itself. They were not paralyzed by their fear. 

5. "Be more concerned with your character than with your reputation, for your character is what you are, while your reputation is merely what others think you are."

The written word is meaningless without personal and professional character to back it up. One lapse in judgment can destroy your reputation.

Dale Carnegie's principles have inspired many an entrepreneur and they teach us to break down business barriers by sharing a part of yourself. In humanizing an interaction, it facilitates a successful outcome. Keep these quotes handy when navigating the entrepreneurial landscape. 

Published on: May 17, 2016
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