By Syed Balkhi, founder of WPBeginner

You might think that only huge companies with large budgets have to hire videographers, content creators and editors, who can pump out a ton of content every day. But that's not the case. Even small startups can become media companies by spending just a couple hours of their day working on developing quality content, like a blog, for example.

It's essential in the crowded world of the web to gain attention and stay top of mind so you can then leverage that attention to sell. Creating content for your business that is not only informative but engaging and compelling is what's going to get consumers to follow your business and return time and again. The more they return to you, the more likely they'll buy from you.

This is why it's important to become a media company. Let's take a look at some strategies for how to turn your business into a media company and why you should start right away.

Create content that educates or entertains.

The first step in turning your business into a media company is, of course, creating content. You must create content that provides value to your audience. Whether you craft content that educates, entertains or does a little bit of both, it must give people a reason to tune in.

One of the easiest ways for small businesses to create content is by starting a blog. If you provide readers with useful information, they'll visit your website on a regular basis to see what great advice you're offering up next.

Another great way to tell your story is to use video. People are visual creatures and video is maybe the most engaging form of content on the web. You don't need fancy equipment anymore. Anyone can produce quality videos with just a smartphone and a YouTube account. Make a behind-the-scenes video of your company or simply film yourself giving some solid great business tips. No matter the medium, creating content will allow people to truly connect with your brand, which will make it easier for you to turn them into customers.

Distribute your content across many channels.

Don't just post your content on your website and be done with it. That's not going to get the views you want. Distribute and promote your content across many different channels if you want to reach a larger audience.

Social media is the word-of-mouth referral tool of this generation. Every time you create content, share it on social media multiple times across multiple different platforms. Use your email list to promote your new content too. In fact, your subscribers should be the first people to know about new content because they're the ones most likely to share it on social media.

Don't stop at sharing your content. Curate content from other sources you can share that will also benefit your readers and widen your reach.

Be consistent.

You're not going to see any results from creating content if you're posting one piece of content this month and not posting anything else for another couple months. If your readers get used to seeing a new post from you every week and then it drops down to nothing, they're going to give up on your site.

Create content on a consistent schedule so your readers know when to look forward to your content and aren't disappointed. If you can't create content every day, set a schedule that works for you, like once a week on Tuesday or every other Wednesday a month. The most successful companies are strict about consistency and providing regular content that their audience can rely on.

According to Gary Vaynerchuk, if you aren't creating stories, you basically don't exist. There is a lot of content to consume on the web. To compete with and rise above other companies, you need to become a media company too. Creating content isn't just filler for your social media feed -- it will allow your business to grow a bigger audience, connect and engage with your users and boost conversions.

Syed Balkhi is the founder of WPBeginner, the largest free WordPress resource site that helps small businesses start their website.

Published on: Aug 16, 2018
The opinions expressed here by Inc.com columnists are their own, not those of Inc.com.